How to Play Cajun Stud Poker

By Michael Stevens in Casino & Gaming on July 8, 2019

5

Minute Read

One of the big trends in new casino games is to take a poker variation and turn it into a house-banked casino game where you play against the dealer instead of against the other players. Cajun Stud Poker is one of this new breed of game.

I don’t think of these games as really being poker games. Instead, I consider games like Cajun Stud to be faux poker. One of the essential aspects of a poker game is the competition between you and the other players at the table.

Cajun Stud is the brainchild of a company called Galaxy Gaming, which makes a number of these kinds of card games.

The game is based loosely on 5-card stud, but it also has elements of Texas hold’em (community cards). You start by placing an ante bet. Then you have opportunities to raise or fold during the exposure of the cards. The game also features side bets.

The Rules for Playing Cajun Stud Poker

You play Cajun Stud with a standard deck of 52 cards. You start the game by placing a bet called an ante, and you can also place additional side bets — the board bonus bet, the pocket bonus bet, and the lo ball bet (I’ll cover the payouts for those bets later in this post).

Once you’ve placed your initial bet, you get two cards. The dealer also deals three community cards face-down.

After you’ve looked at your cards, you have the following options:

  • You can fold
  • You can raise

The size of your raise must be one or three times the size of the ante bet. This is your third street bet.

After that phase of betting is complete, the dealer flips over one of the three community cards.

Then, there’s another betting round with the same options. This is your fourth street bet.

After that, you get to see the next community card. You can again raise or fold. This is your fifth street bet.

Once that betting action is completed, the dealer reveals the final community card and pays off the bets.

Cajun Stud Poker Showing Three Community Cards

With the knowledge of four cards, the player may again raise 1x to 3x his ante bet or fold.

Cajun Stud Bets and Payouts

The ante and raise bets get paid out based on the value of your 5-card poker hand.

It pays off as follows:
  • Royal flush pays off at 500 to 1
  • Straight flush pays off at 100 to 1
  • Four of a kind pays off at 40 to 1
  • Full house pays off at 10 to 1
  • Flush pays off at 6 to 1
  • Straight pays off at 4 to 1
  • Three of a kind pays off at 3 to 1
  • Two pair pays off at 2 to 1
  • A pair of jacks or higher pays off at even money
  • A pair of 6s, 7s, 8s, 9s, or 10s results in a push
  • Any other hand results in a loss for the player

The board bonus bet is paid off based on the three community cards only.

It pays off as follows:
  • Royal flush pays off at 50 to 1
  • Straight flush pays off at 40 to 1
  • Three of a kind pays off at 30 to 1
  • Straight pays off at 6 to 1
  • Flush pays off at 3 to 1
  • A pair pays off at even money
  • Any other hand results in a loss for the player

The pocket bonus is paid off based on your two cards.

It pays off as follows:
  • A pair of aces pays off at 25 to 1
  • A suited ace and a face card pay off at 20 to 1
  • An unsuited ace and a face card pay off at 10 to 1
  • Any other pair pays off at 5 to 1
  • Any other hand results in a loss for the player

The lo ball bet is paid off based on the final 5-card hand, but the goal is to have a low hand.

It pays off as follows:
  • 7 high pays off at 100 to 1
  • 8 high pays off at 50 to 1
  • 9 high pays off at 15 to 1
  • 10 high pays off at 5 to 1
  • Jack high pays off at even money
  • Any other hand results in a loss for the player

Probability, Odds, and the House Edge for Cajun Stud Poker

The house edge for the game, assuming you play with perfect strategy, is 1.4%. If you have no understanding of the strategy for the game, you can safely add between 2% and 4% to that number to account for the strategy mistakes you’ll surely make during the game.

The house edge for the side bets is much higher, and you should just skip the side bets altogether. We’re talking about 7% to 8%, which is worse than the house edge for American roulette, which is no great game, either.

You should put some effort into learning the strategy for Cajun Stud if you’re going to play. If you can afford it, you might also consider trying baccarat, where no strategy is necessary, and the house edge is comparable or better.

Cajun Stud Poker Strategy and How to Win More Often

The first strategy tip is simple enough.

Skip the side bets. The house edge is too high.

After that, strategy is as simple as knowing how much to bet at the various stages of your hands.

The first decision you have to make is on your third street bet. You should raise 3x the size of the ante if you have a pocket pair. Raise 2x the size of the ante if you have at least one high card. You should also raise 2x the size of the ante if you have two cards ranked between 6 and 10. Also, if you have the 5 and 6 of the same suit, you should raise 2x the ante.

You should fold if you have two cards lower than 6 unless you have 5-6 suited.

Two of Spades And Six Of Hearts With Poker Chips In Background

Once you’ve seen the first community card, you should raise 3x the size of the ante if you have any hand that’s already a winner (a made hand). You should also raise 3x the ante if you have a draw to a royal flush or to a straight flush.

You should raise the size of the ante if you have a flush draw, three cards ranked 6 through 10, or if you have a straight draw.

Otherwise, you should fold.

When you’ve seen the second community card, you should raise 3x the size of the ante with any made hand, any flush draw, and any outside straight draw.

You should raise the size of the ante with an inside straight draw, a low-ranked pair, or four cards ranked 6 through 10.

Conclusion

Cajun Stud Poker is a reasonably good casino game version of poker with a reasonably low house edge if you can remember how to play with the correct strategy. It’s a combination of stud poker, and Texas hold’em. If you had to compare it to anything, it probably most closely resembles Mississippi Stud.

Remember, you should skip all the side bets.

The house edge is too high to make any of those bets attractive.

Then just keep in mind the relative value of the cards. Suited cards and connected cards are valuable because of their potential to make flushes and straights. High cards are valuable because the higher the pair is, the better it pays. Low pairs don’t pay well at all.

Also, and this is the easiest part of the strategy to remember:

Always raise the max if you have a made hand.

Michael Stevens

Michael Stevens has been researching and writing topics involving the gambling industry for well over a decade now and is considered an expert on all things casino and sports betting. Michael has been writing for GamblingSites.org since early 2016.

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